You Need to See Sexy Mexican Weather Girl Lluvia Carrillo’s Smoldering Instagram Page


With a first name that means “rain” in Spanish, it’s perfectly fitting that Lluvia Carrillo is a weather girl. 

We’re not sure what the deal is with Mexico’s female reporters, but between Lluvia and Yanet Garcia, they’ve got some seriously gorgeous women dishing up the daily forecast. 

View the original article to see embedded media.

Even though it’s all in Spanish, we highly recommend checking the beauty in action below:

And sorry to squash your hopes and dreams, but she’s in what seems to be a very serious relationship with Javier Aquino, a soccer player for the Mexican national team. 

Telemundo Deportes even ran a report on the power couple’s romance. 

That doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy her smoldering model shots from her fiery Instagram feed. Here’s a sampling: 

View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.
View the original article to see embedded media.

h/t: FHM 

Maxim

Image from page 251 of “Electricity : its medical and surgical applications, including radiotherapy and phototherapy” (1911)

Image from page 251 of “Electricity : its medical and surgical applications, including radiotherapy and phototherapy” (1911)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: electricityitsme00pott
Title: Electricity : its medical and surgical applications, including radiotherapy and phototherapy
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Potts, Charles S. (Charles Sower), 1864- Richards, Horace Clark Pancoast, Henry Khunrath, 1875-1939
Subjects: Electrotherapeutics Radiotherapy Phototherapy Electric Stimulation Therapy Radiotherapy Phototherapy
Publisher: Philadelphia New York : Lea & Febiger
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
t least once daily, and oftener if possible. The current strengthshould be increased gradually to the desired strength and decreased instrength gradually; sudden interruptions of the circuit must be avoided.A solution of cocaine placed on the anode will increase the palliativeeffects of this method (see Phoresis). In the treatment of diffuse pains, as in muscular rheumatism, thelabile method may be employed. The same general principles justdescribed also hold good when this method is used. A larger electrodemay, however, be used. For the relief of localized muscular spasm, the anode stabile over theaffected muscles and their supplying nerves, as in the treatment ofneuralgia, is the most useful plan. The combined faradic and galvanic current (p. 221) has been muchlauded by Rockwell for the relief of localized muscular spasms. It isapplied by means of moist electrodes, as either current would beseparately. The currents are combined in one circuit by an arrange-ment of switches (p. 123).

Text Appearing After Image:
1, shepherds crook held by patient; 2, ground chain to water pipe; 3, wire brush electrode;4, ground chain to gas pipe. (Snow.) Static Current.—^To obtain the local sedative effects of the staticcurrent either the static spray, breeze, brush discharge, static induced,or wave currents may be employed. Under some conditions sparksmay also prove useful (pp. 124 and 231). The spray is administered asfollows (Arnold Snow) (Fig. 211): 1. The poles of the machine are widely separated. 2. The patient on the insulated stool holds the shepherds crook,connecting him to either side of the machine, preferably the positive. 244 METHODS OF PRODUCING LOCAL ELECTRIFICATION 3. If connected to the positive, the negative side is grounded, andmce versa (p. 211). 4. The operator then administers the breeze by a to-and-fro motionof either a brush (Fig. 192, a) or point electrode (Fig. 192, e). Care mustbe taken not to bring the electrode too close to the patient, as a painfulspark may be discharged. The c

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 92 of “Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved” (1919)

Image from page 92 of “Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved” (1919)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: horticulturetext02davi
Title: Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Davis, Kary Cadmus, 1867-1936
Subjects: Gardening Vegetable gardening Fruit-culture
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J. B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
s of 15 Continuous cultivation 5 Companion cropping 5 Succession cropping 5 E—Care of Tools 10 F—Value of produce 15 Used at home 5 Sold in the market 5 Used for canning 5 G —Accuracy of garden records 10 100 SURVEYS, EXERCISES, AND PROJECTS 79 SURVEYS, EXERCISES, AND PROJECTS 1. Garden Survey.—Plan a garden survey of your community. Let itcover the conditions for the last year or two. Size of garden. Number ofkinds of vegetables grown. Chief products. Uses made of products. Numberof people in each family. Whether horse culture was employed. 2. Review the facts obtained in above survey, or conduct independentsurvey to determine the profits or income from gardens having a surplus to sell. 3. Determine from the facts obtained how many families produce mostof their vegetables for (1) summer use, (2) for winter use. Also find methodsof storing, preserving, drying, etc. 4. Calculate the total amount of money saved to the community by homegardening instead of buying products needed.

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 55.—One attachment of the wheel cultivator is a small turning plow which may beused to cover grass and weeds. This boy makes good use of it. (Bateman Mfg. Co.) 5. Determine approximately the time and amount of labor lost wherehorse culture is not used. 6. Garden Plans.—Draw several of the best garden plans found in thecommunity. Then draw several of the poorest plans, where beds are chieflyused. Contrast these and replan the poor ones. 7. Study vegetable borders found in the community. What crops aregrown in them? What methods of mulching and culture are used? 8. Make some ideal home garden plans to include all vegetables whichshould be grown in the spring, summer and fall gardens. 9. Truck Gardens.—Visit market gardens and truck gardens, and study thesystem of rotation, succession, companion cropping, harvesting and marketing. 10. Tools and Implements.—Make a list of the garden planters, wheelhoes, other kinds of cultivators, and other kinds of garden tools and implement

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 961 of “Christian herald” (1913)

Image from page 961 of “Christian herald” (1913)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: christianherald36unse
Title: Christian herald
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: Christian Herald Association
Digitizing Sponsor: Tisch Library, Tufts University

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
anage, where we could send some of the orphansto t)e cared for by the Christian Htrald funds. His work sofar has been done by faith, and we aie sure that whatever goodcan be done for that orphanage will prove a great blessing tomany little ones. The place is valued at 8,000 francs, or ,300.We believe that the Christian Herald readers will be deeplyinterested in the work of Mr. Barumoff and will support him indoing a far grander work than he has been able to do in the pastby putting into his hands the means of sheltering many an(irphan in the.se present times. A few months ago victorious Bulgaria won the sympathy andapplause of all Europe and America. Now it is left all alone tostruggle for its very life. Whether she brought upon herselfthis disaster, or whether it was caused by the jealousy andtreachery of her allies, I shall not undertake to prove, but willleave it for the impartial historian to bring to light and to record. carrying away flour distribuchristian herald belief com.m

Text Appearing After Image:
MRS. FURNA.TIEFI TED BY Meanwhile, we beg the Christian people of AmerjltoITTEE retain their sympathy for Bulgaria, not believini many false reports against her in the papers,they can hear her side and the official internainvestigation. Being myelf a Bulgarian, and having witnessesgreat misery and sufferings of my people, I cibut plead their cau.^e. Bulgaria will ever be gr;to the Christian people of the world for all theydone for her in the past; and in her present pineeds she again turns to Christendom for sym]and help. Our hospitals are full of sick, wounded and crijsoldiers; but there are comparatively few d(and nurses to care for them. Our towns are ciwith poor, hungry, suffering people; hundredswidows and orphans. At present we have in our towns over one hnnlthousand Macedonian refugees, who are sharing with osbread of sorrow and uniting with us in earnest appeals tofor speedy relief. I have come to this country, feeling the great burden onheart of the homeless and poor people 1

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 224 of “Complete works, with life, compendium, and concordance” (1896)

Image from page 224 of “Complete works, with life, compendium, and concordance” (1896)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: completeworkswit06shakuoft
Title: Complete works, with life, compendium, and concordance
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Johnson, Samuel, 1709-1784
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia Gebbie Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
mountain to])s.I must be gone and live, or stay and die. Jul. Yon light is not daylight, I know it, I:It is some meteor that the sun exhales,To be to thee this night a torch-bearer,And hght thee on thy way to Mantua:Therefoie stay yet, thou needst not to be gone. Rom. Let me be taen, let me be put to death;I am content, so thou wilt have it so.Ill say yon gray is not the mornings eye,Tis but the i)ale reflex of Cynthias brow;Nor that is not the lark whose notes do beatThe vanity heaven so high above our heads:I have moi-e care to stay than will to go.—Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.—How ist, my soul? lets talk,—it is not day. Jxd. It IS, it is,—hie hence, be gone, away!It is the lark that sings so out of tune.Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.Some say the lark makes sweet division;This doth not so, for she di^ideth us:Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyesjO, now I would they had changd voices too!Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray,

Text Appearing After Image:
ROMEO AND JULIET SCENE V. ROMEO AND JULIET. 199 Htmtiug thee hence Avdth hunts-up to the day.0, now be gone; more light and light it grows. IiQm. More light and light,—more dark and dark ourwees! Enter Nurse. Nurse. Madam! Jul. Nurse? Nurse. Your lady mother is coming to your chamber:The day is broke; be wary, look about. [ExiL Jul. Then, window, let day in and let life out. Rom. Farewell, farewell! one kiss, and Ill descend. [Descends. Jul. Art thou gone so? my lord, my love, my friend!I must hear from thee every day i the hour,For in a minute there are many days:O, by this count I shall be much in yearaEre 1 again behold mj Romeo! Rom. Farewell!I mil omit no opportunityThat may convey my greetings, love, to thee. Jul. 0, thinkst thou we shall ever meet again ? Horn. I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serveFor sweet discourses in our time to come. Jul. 0 God! I have an ill-divining soul IMethiuks I see thee, now thou art below,As one dead in the bottom of a tomb:Either my eye

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 254 of “Emblemi di Q. Orazio Flacco” (1777)

Image from page 254 of “Emblemi di Q. Orazio Flacco” (1777)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: emblemidiqorazio00veen
Title: Emblemi di Q. Orazio Flacco
Year: 1777 (1770s)
Authors: Veen, Otto van, 1556-1629 Mulinari, Stefano, ca 1741-ca. 1790 Horace
Subjects: Horace Emblem books, Dutch
Publisher: Firenze : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ate ni . Extra fortunam e/i quidquid donatur amicis ^ Martial. Oji^as dederis, folas Jemper habehis opes. ì 12 TUTTI POETANO li. KIJ GJÌAlfBE AB.f031E AI^iL UOMO CHE E ]LIBEilA]LE Lib- I- OjE mai freddo febbrile ò più mortale Ma/a tua ti forprev.de -, e ti cojtringeA ripofar neW odiofe piume,Dimmi avrai forfè chi ti feda accanto ^E bagni ai mali tuoi di pianto i lumi ^Chi ti prepari le fornente, e anfiofoIl Aledico ricerchi oiìde ti rendaSano air ajfitta Moglie, e ai cari figli ?Nò ma la Moglie, e i tuoi figlioli ijtejjiNon brameranno mai la tua jalute,E infin tutti i vicini avranti in odio.E poi ti maravigli fé quelli attiD amor che tu pretendi non ricevi,A^t* meritafii mai, e fé tu foloPreferiti il danaro a quanto maiE di più fiero in Cielo, e care in terra. Cictr. Chi è liberale fi concilia la benevolenza, e 1 amore altrui per vivere tranquillamente. Martlal. ^^^ ^^^^ fi ^^^ ^^ f^^^ diletti amici E un ben che fempre effte., e che giammaiSoggiace alle vicende della forte.

Text Appearing After Image:
VARIUM PECUNIaE M S N 1 V 1 Mperat^ aitt fervH collega pecnma cutque y epììii». Torttim dìgna feqni potùis, qnàm ducere fimem. Q^tò melior fervo ^ quo ìiberior Jìt avariiSy Lib. r. In trìvi]s fixum cum fé demìtùt ob ajjem ; Epift-1<?< No7i video . Naw qui cnpiet, metitet quoqtieporro,Qui metiieus vivit, lìber wiln non erit wnqiiam. Qui pecuniae fervit, & praefcntibus compedibus con-ilringitur, & futuris paiatur . F f e*i3Iveiiso im tutti il, mobo bi bomimasie l,e 11igchez:2e lóm io. -^ Egna 0 ferve a ciaf e un la 112 affa d oro Che pur dovrìa dal freno effer guidataNe trarre avvinto luomo allejite voglie. Lib. r. Io comprender non so qual (la migliore ^ * E flit di un fervo liberta refpiri Q_nelC avaro che incurva^ e piega il dorfoPer le pubbliche (Irade, e un vii danaroDi rame infin giunge a fcavar fra ì fajji.Jl defiderio è dal timor fegititoE quei che teme non farà giammaiCol bel nome di libero chiamato. Chi ferve al danaro Ci trova non folo ftretto

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 97 of “Modern plumbing illustrated : a comprehensive and thoroughly practical work on the modern and most approved methods of plumbing construction …” (1907)

Image from page 97 of “Modern plumbing illustrated : a comprehensive and thoroughly practical work on the modern and most approved methods of plumbing construction …” (1907)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: modernplumbingilstar
Title: Modern plumbing illustrated : a comprehensive and thoroughly practical work on the modern and most approved methods of plumbing construction …
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Starbuck, R. M. (Robert Macy), 1844-1927
Subjects: Plumbing
Publisher: New York : N.W. Henley
Contributing Library: Boston College Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
MricJt ^ Vertical<3tocIa

Text Appearing After Image:
j^^ j^i ^^^. p>ipe -SupcS/iftiisQ SUPPORTING AND RUNNING OF SOIL PIPE Too much care cannot be exercised in the running and support-ing of soil pipes. They are generally made tight by caulked leadjoints, which are easily made defective when moved in any way,owing to the great weight and leverage of the pipe. Few plumbingsystems that have been in use for a number of years would showperfect joints under test, and in many cases this condition is due toimperfect supporting of the pipe. When a vertical line drops to the cellar bottom, it should restupon a thick flagging or upon a brick or stone foundation, as in Fig. E. Care should be taken in building such a pier during the winterseason that there is no frost beneath it, which would allow the pierand stack to settle when it thawed. Brick or stone piers should also support a horizontal line run-ning above the cellar bottom, particularly at points where verticalstacks enter it. The use of piers to support horizontal lines runningbelow the

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 372 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)

Image from page 372 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: railwaymechanica95newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
es care should betaken to include capital charges both upon the old and newinvestments. Analyses of this character are of the utmost value indetermining whether or not it is wise to make expendituresfor machinery and if prepared in a true businesslike man-ner they will be of great assistance in demonstrating to themanagement just how much can be saved and exactly towhat extent new machinery is justified. Improving a Shop by a Limited Expenditure A Small Production Department Relieves the MachineShop and Insures Maximum Output from New Tools BY G. M. LAWRENCE THERE is little chance for argument about the necessityfor improved shop machinery. Now that the LaborBoard has abolished the National Agreements andlaid down a set of rules which give promise of pavingthe way for industrial peace through local conference andagreement, it is the hope of all shop supervisors that moreconsideration will be given the problem of shop equipment.However natural it is to blame all our troubles on the war

Text Appearing After Image:
Main Rod Brasses, Machined in Shop Order Lots of 30 Pairs and the result of federal control, most shop men know thatthe present lack of efficiency is partly the result of neglectin keeping abreast of the times with needed improvementsin the shop to properly maintain the ever changing loco-motive. For many years, while inventive genius has en-larged and improved the locomotive from a 40 to 60-ton machine to the present magnificent power plant, the shopand terminal facilities for handling the locomotive on alarge number of railroads have practically stood still, leav-ing the inventive mechanic to work out the problem ofmaintenance with equipment 40 years old. Of course someenlargement of terminals, turntables, coaling facilities, etc.,has been made as a result of necessity and electric and oxy-acetylene welding and cutting have been introduced in mostshops, but in too many shop the progress has stopped here.In no department is the neglect more apparent than in themachine shop. To correc

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 91 of “Hardware merchandising (August-December 1907)” (1907)

Image from page 91 of “Hardware merchandising (August-December 1907)” (1907)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: hardmerchaugdec1907toro
Title: Hardware merchandising (August-December 1907)
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
THE LONG is the time it wears. It stands the test of heatand frost, wind and rain, and gives your cus-tomers manv years of solid satisfaction. THE SHORT part is the time needed to put it on. A greatdeal of time—which means a great deal ofmoney—is saved to the man who uses SHIELD BRANDREADY ROOFING LOCKERBY ®> McCOMB t>3 SHANNON STREET MONTREAL Sorting the Scrap :>e care fully Not all scrap makes good bar iron—it must hselected to give satisfactory results. London Dar Iron is made only from the choicest scrap,selected by experts. Consumers are unanimous that it has thequality. Orders promptly filled. London Rolling MillsLondon, Canada. n

Text Appearing After Image:

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 67 of “Adunanze degli Arcadi pubblicate nelle nozze di … Giacinta Orsini … con … Don Antonio Boncompagno Ludovisi” (1757)

Image from page 67 of “Adunanze degli Arcadi pubblicate nelle nozze di … Giacinta Orsini … con … Don Antonio Boncompagno Ludovisi” (1757)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: adunanzedegliarc00cava
Title: Adunanze degli Arcadi pubblicate nelle nozze di … Giacinta Orsini … con … Don Antonio Boncompagno Ludovisi
Year: 1757 (1750s)
Authors: Cavagna Sangiuliani di Gualdana, Antonio, conte, 1843-1913, former owner. IU-R
Subjects:
Publisher: Roma
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
argendo Arcadi Mufe:Chi talza allEtra, e par che larte accufeSe col fuono agguagliar non fa tue lodi. Chi di tua Cetra gli armoniofi modi,Chi le bellezze da natura infufe,Chi le glorie degli Avi in Te trasfufeNe tuoi rammentan Coniugali Nodi* Anchio Paftore fconofciuto, e vile Su dun Faggio eternar volea^ tuo Nome,Ed al crine intrecciarti un fregio umile» Ma vidi, il giuro, incoronar tue chiome,Vidi lifteffo Febo, e allor lo ItileJLailo ! di man mi cadde, io non fo come ♦ Del <*4 Del mede/ime SONETTO. QOgni, e favole fur dIngegno Afcreo,^ Che in Atene fiori vana, e mendace ,Del gran Figliuol dUrania, e di LieoIl vago Serto, e la foave Face. Allor di due beliAlme lImeneo Splende in fen del piacere, e della pace,Segual tempra di genio il Ciel lor feo,Egual forte, egual fen dAmor capace. Or fé bellarmonìa dogni coftumeIn Voi fiorifce: Se co dardi fuoiDel par vi punge il faretrato Nume: Se lunga ferie donorati Eroi Vi circondano il crin dimmenfo lume,Bella Coppia Real, ditelo Voi.

Text Appearing After Image:
Dei Del S)gnoi LUIGI SUBLEYRAS Fra eli Arcadi OALISIQ enopfo SONETTO. I) Er quelle faci luminofe, e chiare,A Chaccenderti Imeneo, pel cafto ardore.Che deglIncliti Sposi in volto appare5Sen va fuperbo di fé fteffo Amore. Lieto ne gode in le beate, e care Sedi, degli Avi Eccelfi il nobil core,Unir veggendo in nove guife, e rareGloria, Beltade, Leggiadria, Valore . De carmi al fuon, che della gioja è Figlio,Eco fanno le fponde : e in dolce orgoglioDi Roma il Genio rafferena il ciglio: Mentre fpera veder fui Campidoglio Pari agli Avi nel merto, e nel configlìoNafcere i Figli, ed i Nepoti al Soglio * Vel 66 Del Signor Conte NICOLA FERDINANDO PERIBERTX Fra gli Arcadi FAUSTILBO DIPEO S 0 NE T T 0. QE riveder del Tebro a me fia dato^ Dopo tre luftri, o del Sebeto londe;E quivi ammirerò Garzon ben natoGenerofo calcar le augufte fponde: Che fia delle beli1 Arti innamorato, DIdea fublime, a cui ridon fecondeLe Mufe, e accefo il feno oltre lufatoDella Virtù , che al volgo il Cielo afconde Al

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.