Do licensors learn from out-licensing? Empirical evidence from the pharmaceutical industry.

  Biowebspin, May 22th, 2017

Do licensors learn from out-licensing? Empirical evidence from the pharmaceutical industry.

by M Rabijns, B Leten, S Kelchtermans, M Riccaboni, 2016

While the financial performance effects of licensing to the licensor have been covered extensively in prior literature, little attention has been paid so far to the possible learning effects of out-licensing. This paper aims to fill that gap by looking at wheter – subsequent to an ou-licensing deal – licensors are more likely to cite work from their licensing partner, wich we see as a proxy for learning from the licensing deal. To answer this question, wes analyze a cross-sectionnal licensing dataset in the pharmaceutical industry between 1995 and 2003. Preliminary results show evidence of learning by licensors from licensees, measured by patent citations after the licensing deal. The findings further our understanding of markets for technology and, in particular, attenuate the trade-off faced by licensors.

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Event Listing: 18th Annual Drug Discovery Summit, 12-13 June 2017, Berlin

 

Oxford Global’s – 18th Annual Drug Discovery Leaders’ Summit

12-13 June 2017, Hotel Palace in Berlin, Germany.

Oxford Global present the 18th Annual Drug Discovery Leaders’ Summit that brings together over 250 key opinion leaders and senior industry experts in drug discovery, to discuss the latest innovative discovery strategies in different therapeutic areas as well as the most effective enabling technologies and solutions. The co-located 5th Discovery Chemistry & Drug Design Congress provides an unprecedented opportunity to gain insights from key presenters of the computational chemistry, discovery chemistry and medicinal field.

You can download the agenda here:

6 interactive streams:

  • Drug Discovery Innovation and Strategies, Enabling Technologies
  • Novel Drug Target Discovery for Immuno-Therapy, Autoimmune Diseases and Oncology
  • Successful Phenotypic Drug Discovery: High Content Screening
  • RNAi Screening, Cancer Genomics and Gene Editing for Drug Discovery
  • Discovery Chemistry, Medicinal and Computational Chemistry
  • Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Design: Novel Approaches.

Free Webinar Recordings

Drug Discovery Open Innovation & Outsourcing

Hosted by Patrick Kleyn, Director of Drug Target Innovation, EMD Serono
Download for Free Today

Phenotypic Screening in Drug Discovery- Novel Tools & Applications

Hosted by Paul Andrews, Director of Operations, National Phenotypic Screening Centre (NPSC), School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee
Download for Free Today

Disruptive Technologies & Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery

Hosted by Chris Gibson, CEO, Recursion Pharmaceuticals
Download for Free Today

For further information on the congress and the webinars, please contact Guillaume Alonso on g.alonso@oxfordglobal.co.uk or call +44 (0) 1865 248 455.

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Biotechnology firms – improvement in innovation speed

  Biowebspin, April 20th, 2017

Biotechnology firms – improvement in innovation speed

by Hadi Farid, Fatemeh Hakimian, Mohd Nazari Ismail, Pradeep Kumar Nair, in International Journal of Business Innovation and Research , 2017

According to the competitive and rapidly changing world of biotechnology, innovation speed is considered to be one of the fundamental organisational issues facing managers. Defining and implementing the appropriate strategy depends on several factors, which may differ from one industry to another. This study was designed to investigate the selected antecedents of innovation speed specifically for agro-biotechnological products in Malaysia. Self-developed questionnaires were distributed among the managers and 142 questionnaires were selected to be used for the purpose of data analysis. Data management and analysis were performed using structural equation modelling-partial least squares. The statistical results showed the significant relationship between managerial skill, market-related knowledge and experience, and innovation speed. The findings of this research did not support the relationship between extension and innovation speed. This study has also provided a practical guideline for Malaysian agro-biotechnological managers who aim to increase the innovation speed of a new agro-biotechnological product.

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Open Data for Research and Strategic Monitoring in the Pharmaceutical and Biotech Industry

  Biowebspin, April 12th, 2017

Open Data for Research and Strategic Monitoring in the Pharmaceutical and Biotech Industry

by Baldissera Giovani, in Data Science Journal, 2017

Open data is considered the new oil. As oil can be used to produce fertilisers, pesticides, lubricants, plastics and many other derivatives, so data is considered the commodity to use and re-use to create value.
The number of initiatives supporting free access to data has increased in the last years and open data is becoming the norm in the public sector; the approach empowers stakeholders and nurtures the economy.
Even if at early stage, private companies also are adapting to the open data market. A survey was conducted to which thirteen companies of different size (from micro enterprises to world-leading pharmas) in the pharmaceutical and biotech sector and representing four business models archetypes of companies exploiting open data (aggregators, developers, enrichers and enablers) participated.
The information collected provides a snapshot of the use of open data by the pharmaceutical and biotech industry in 2015–2016. The companies interviewed use open data to complement proprietary data for research purposes, to implement licensing-in/licensing-out strategies, to map partnerships and connections among players or to identify key expertise and hire staff.
Pharmaceutical and biotech companies have made of the protection of knowledge a dogma at the foundation of their business models, but using and contributing to the open data movement may change their approach to intellectual property and innovation.

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The venture capital in the biotechnology industry

  Biowebspin, October 6th, 2016

The venture capital in the biotechnology industry

by Grislain, Jacques-Henry, in DSpace, 2016

The Biotechnology investment sector has been booming over the last ten years delivering substantial financial returns for public and private investors and most VC firms have been raising and deploying a lot of capital into fast-growing Biotechnology companies. However, it may seem paradoxical that the Biotechnology industry attracts increasingly more Venture Capital and Public funding whereas it is one of the riskiest and volatile sectors and most early-stage companies do not generate revenues for years and have large financial needs to cover expensive clinical trials. My research will focus on Biotechnology investments in the US and will cover the value chain of a Venture Capital firm with a competitive analysis, a detailed review of current funding trends, a performance review analysis and a study to explain why Boston has become the n°1 cluster for Biotechnology in the US. The study also includes feedbacks from 25 interviews conducted with Founders and CEOs of Biotechnology companies, Life Sciences experts, Scientists and Venture Capital investors.

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Accelerating Precision Drug Development and Drug Repurposing by Leveraging Human Genetics

  Biowebspin, April 12th, 2017

Accelerating Precision Drug Development and Drug Repurposing by Leveraging Human Genetics

by Jill M. Pulley, Jana K. Shirey-Rice, Robert R. Lavieri, Rebecca N. Jerome, Nicole M. Zaleski, David M. Aronoff, Lisa Bastarache, Xinnan Niu, Kenneth J. Holroyd, Dan M. Roden, Eric P. Skaar, Colleen M. Niswender, Lawrence J. Marnett, Craig W. Lindsley, Leeland B. Ekstrom, Alan R. Bentley, Gordon R. Bernard, Charles C. Hong and Joshua C. Denny, in ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies, 2017

The potential impact of using human genetic data linked to longitudinal electronic medical records on drug development is extraordinary; however, the practical application of these data necessitates some organizational innovations. Vanderbilt has created resources such as an easily queried database of >2.6 million de-identified electronic health records linked to BioVU, which is a DNA biobank with more than 230,000 unique samples. To ensure these data are used to maximally benefit and accelerate both de novo drug discovery and drug repurposing efforts, we created the Accelerating Drug Development and Repurposing Incubator, a multidisciplinary think tank of experts in various therapeutic areas within both basic and clinical science as well as experts in legal, business, and other operational domains. The Incubator supports a diverse pipeline of drug indication finding projects, leveraging the natural experiment of human genetics.

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Open innovation and company culture: Internal openness makes the difference

  Biowebspin, April 12th, 2017

Open innovation and company culture: Internal openness makes the difference

by Jan Kratzer, Dirk Meissnerb, Vitaly Roud, in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 2017

There is a common agreement that innovation is driven by the people that form the heart of any company’s innovation activity. Still, people perform innovation in a special institutional environment characterized by rules and regulations that might support or impede innovation. The open innovation paradigm expects companies to engage in external relationships for innovation; however companies often neglect the actual internal openness of employees, which is an absolute must before partnering with external partners. The article finds that company innovation culture comes in five main forms: closed innovation (driven by internal capabilities); doing, using, interacting (ad hoc processes, no link to knowledge providers); outsourcing innovation capabilities; extramural innovation, no matching internal culture/procedures and proactive innovation (match of internal and external openness). The empirical analysis shows that the closed innovation behavior is by far the most widespread among Russian companies whereas proactive innovation behavior remains an exception in the overall sample.

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Image by moritz.schmaltz

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How do patents affect research investments?

  Biowebspin, January 30th, 2016

How do patents affect research investments?

by Heidi L. Williams, 2017

While patent systems have been widely used both historically and internationally, there is nonetheless a tremendous amount of controversy over whether patent systems – in practice – improve the alignment between private returns and social contributions. In this paper, I describe three parameters – how the disclosure function affects research investments, how patent strength affects research investments in new technologies, and how patents on existing technologies affect follow-on innovation – needed to inform the question of how patents affect research investments, and review the available evidence which has attempted to empirically estimate these parameters.

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