E-CARE Fall 2016

E-CARE Fall 2016
e-care
Image by Arlington County Environmental Services
With more than 1400 residents coming out, we collected 32.7 tons of household hazardous materials. It was a success!

E-CARE Fall 2016

E-CARE Fall 2016
e-care
Image by Arlington County Environmental Services
With more than 1400 residents coming out, we collected 32.7 tons of household hazardous materials. It was a success!

E-CARE Fall 2016

E-CARE Fall 2016
e-care
Image by Arlington County Environmental Services
With more than 1400 residents coming out, we collected 32.7 tons of household hazardous materials. It was a success!

E-CARE Fall 2016

E-CARE Fall 2016
e-care
Image by Arlington County Environmental Services
With more than 1400 residents coming out, we collected 32.7 tons of household hazardous materials. It was a success!

E-CARE Fall 2016

E-CARE Fall 2016
e-care
Image by Arlington County Environmental Services
With more than 1400 residents coming out, we collected 32.7 tons of household hazardous materials. It was a success!

E-CARE Fall 2016

E-CARE Fall 2016
e-care
Image by Arlington County Environmental Services
With more than 1400 residents coming out, we collected 32.7 tons of household hazardous materials. It was a success!

Image from page 251 of “Electricity : its medical and surgical applications, including radiotherapy and phototherapy” (1911)

Image from page 251 of “Electricity : its medical and surgical applications, including radiotherapy and phototherapy” (1911)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: electricityitsme00pott
Title: Electricity : its medical and surgical applications, including radiotherapy and phototherapy
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Potts, Charles S. (Charles Sower), 1864- Richards, Horace Clark Pancoast, Henry Khunrath, 1875-1939
Subjects: Electrotherapeutics Radiotherapy Phototherapy Electric Stimulation Therapy Radiotherapy Phototherapy
Publisher: Philadelphia New York : Lea & Febiger
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
t least once daily, and oftener if possible. The current strengthshould be increased gradually to the desired strength and decreased instrength gradually; sudden interruptions of the circuit must be avoided.A solution of cocaine placed on the anode will increase the palliativeeffects of this method (see Phoresis). In the treatment of diffuse pains, as in muscular rheumatism, thelabile method may be employed. The same general principles justdescribed also hold good when this method is used. A larger electrodemay, however, be used. For the relief of localized muscular spasm, the anode stabile over theaffected muscles and their supplying nerves, as in the treatment ofneuralgia, is the most useful plan. The combined faradic and galvanic current (p. 221) has been muchlauded by Rockwell for the relief of localized muscular spasms. It isapplied by means of moist electrodes, as either current would beseparately. The currents are combined in one circuit by an arrange-ment of switches (p. 123).

Text Appearing After Image:
1, shepherds crook held by patient; 2, ground chain to water pipe; 3, wire brush electrode;4, ground chain to gas pipe. (Snow.) Static Current.—^To obtain the local sedative effects of the staticcurrent either the static spray, breeze, brush discharge, static induced,or wave currents may be employed. Under some conditions sparksmay also prove useful (pp. 124 and 231). The spray is administered asfollows (Arnold Snow) (Fig. 211): 1. The poles of the machine are widely separated. 2. The patient on the insulated stool holds the shepherds crook,connecting him to either side of the machine, preferably the positive. 244 METHODS OF PRODUCING LOCAL ELECTRIFICATION 3. If connected to the positive, the negative side is grounded, andmce versa (p. 211). 4. The operator then administers the breeze by a to-and-fro motionof either a brush (Fig. 192, a) or point electrode (Fig. 192, e). Care mustbe taken not to bring the electrode too close to the patient, as a painfulspark may be discharged. The c

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 92 of “Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved” (1919)

Image from page 92 of “Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved” (1919)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: horticulturetext02davi
Title: Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Davis, Kary Cadmus, 1867-1936
Subjects: Gardening Vegetable gardening Fruit-culture
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J. B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
s of 15 Continuous cultivation 5 Companion cropping 5 Succession cropping 5 E—Care of Tools 10 F—Value of produce 15 Used at home 5 Sold in the market 5 Used for canning 5 G —Accuracy of garden records 10 100 SURVEYS, EXERCISES, AND PROJECTS 79 SURVEYS, EXERCISES, AND PROJECTS 1. Garden Survey.—Plan a garden survey of your community. Let itcover the conditions for the last year or two. Size of garden. Number ofkinds of vegetables grown. Chief products. Uses made of products. Numberof people in each family. Whether horse culture was employed. 2. Review the facts obtained in above survey, or conduct independentsurvey to determine the profits or income from gardens having a surplus to sell. 3. Determine from the facts obtained how many families produce mostof their vegetables for (1) summer use, (2) for winter use. Also find methodsof storing, preserving, drying, etc. 4. Calculate the total amount of money saved to the community by homegardening instead of buying products needed.

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 55.—One attachment of the wheel cultivator is a small turning plow which may beused to cover grass and weeds. This boy makes good use of it. (Bateman Mfg. Co.) 5. Determine approximately the time and amount of labor lost wherehorse culture is not used. 6. Garden Plans.—Draw several of the best garden plans found in thecommunity. Then draw several of the poorest plans, where beds are chieflyused. Contrast these and replan the poor ones. 7. Study vegetable borders found in the community. What crops aregrown in them? What methods of mulching and culture are used? 8. Make some ideal home garden plans to include all vegetables whichshould be grown in the spring, summer and fall gardens. 9. Truck Gardens.—Visit market gardens and truck gardens, and study thesystem of rotation, succession, companion cropping, harvesting and marketing. 10. Tools and Implements.—Make a list of the garden planters, wheelhoes, other kinds of cultivators, and other kinds of garden tools and implement

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 961 of “Christian herald” (1913)

Image from page 961 of “Christian herald” (1913)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: christianherald36unse
Title: Christian herald
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: Christian Herald Association
Digitizing Sponsor: Tisch Library, Tufts University

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
anage, where we could send some of the orphansto t)e cared for by the Christian Htrald funds. His work sofar has been done by faith, and we aie sure that whatever goodcan be done for that orphanage will prove a great blessing tomany little ones. The place is valued at 8,000 francs, or ,300.We believe that the Christian Herald readers will be deeplyinterested in the work of Mr. Barumoff and will support him indoing a far grander work than he has been able to do in the pastby putting into his hands the means of sheltering many an(irphan in the.se present times. A few months ago victorious Bulgaria won the sympathy andapplause of all Europe and America. Now it is left all alone tostruggle for its very life. Whether she brought upon herselfthis disaster, or whether it was caused by the jealousy andtreachery of her allies, I shall not undertake to prove, but willleave it for the impartial historian to bring to light and to record. carrying away flour distribuchristian herald belief com.m

Text Appearing After Image:
MRS. FURNA.TIEFI TED BY Meanwhile, we beg the Christian people of AmerjltoITTEE retain their sympathy for Bulgaria, not believini many false reports against her in the papers,they can hear her side and the official internainvestigation. Being myelf a Bulgarian, and having witnessesgreat misery and sufferings of my people, I cibut plead their cau.^e. Bulgaria will ever be gr;to the Christian people of the world for all theydone for her in the past; and in her present pineeds she again turns to Christendom for sym]and help. Our hospitals are full of sick, wounded and crijsoldiers; but there are comparatively few d(and nurses to care for them. Our towns are ciwith poor, hungry, suffering people; hundredswidows and orphans. At present we have in our towns over one hnnlthousand Macedonian refugees, who are sharing with osbread of sorrow and uniting with us in earnest appeals tofor speedy relief. I have come to this country, feeling the great burden onheart of the homeless and poor people 1

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 224 of “Complete works, with life, compendium, and concordance” (1896)

Image from page 224 of “Complete works, with life, compendium, and concordance” (1896)
e-care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: completeworkswit06shakuoft
Title: Complete works, with life, compendium, and concordance
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Johnson, Samuel, 1709-1784
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia Gebbie Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
mountain to])s.I must be gone and live, or stay and die. Jul. Yon light is not daylight, I know it, I:It is some meteor that the sun exhales,To be to thee this night a torch-bearer,And hght thee on thy way to Mantua:Therefoie stay yet, thou needst not to be gone. Rom. Let me be taen, let me be put to death;I am content, so thou wilt have it so.Ill say yon gray is not the mornings eye,Tis but the i)ale reflex of Cynthias brow;Nor that is not the lark whose notes do beatThe vanity heaven so high above our heads:I have moi-e care to stay than will to go.—Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.—How ist, my soul? lets talk,—it is not day. Jxd. It IS, it is,—hie hence, be gone, away!It is the lark that sings so out of tune.Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.Some say the lark makes sweet division;This doth not so, for she di^ideth us:Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyesjO, now I would they had changd voices too!Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray,

Text Appearing After Image:
ROMEO AND JULIET SCENE V. ROMEO AND JULIET. 199 Htmtiug thee hence Avdth hunts-up to the day.0, now be gone; more light and light it grows. IiQm. More light and light,—more dark and dark ourwees! Enter Nurse. Nurse. Madam! Jul. Nurse? Nurse. Your lady mother is coming to your chamber:The day is broke; be wary, look about. [ExiL Jul. Then, window, let day in and let life out. Rom. Farewell, farewell! one kiss, and Ill descend. [Descends. Jul. Art thou gone so? my lord, my love, my friend!I must hear from thee every day i the hour,For in a minute there are many days:O, by this count I shall be much in yearaEre 1 again behold mj Romeo! Rom. Farewell!I mil omit no opportunityThat may convey my greetings, love, to thee. Jul. 0, thinkst thou we shall ever meet again ? Horn. I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serveFor sweet discourses in our time to come. Jul. 0 God! I have an ill-divining soul IMethiuks I see thee, now thou art below,As one dead in the bottom of a tomb:Either my eye

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.